10th anniversary of Wynwood Walls!
Ron English

10th anniversary of Wynwood Walls!

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It is hard to believe that it has already been 10 years since the official opening of Wynwood Walls. Thanks to this occasion I decided to write a short post about this special festival and explain why you need to add it to your bucket list.

Miami is one of the richest cities in the United States. It is also the house to one of the most awaited art events every year – Art Basel that takes place in Miami Beach. No wonder that once the urban art fever hit the art world, Miami needed to find their way to step up their game. The abandoned warehouses of Wynwood, in the heart of the city, were a perfect place for artists and migrants to settle in the early 2000s. It was back in 2009 that Tony Goldman decided to organize a festival there by inviting some of the world-leading street artists to create large scale murals. The painted area is growing every day, as it has already been a popular graffiti destination. The popularity of art Basel helped to attract some of the biggest collectors and art lovers from around the world, creating great chances for graffiti artists to prove their talents do not grow far from those presented at the official fair. Former vandals get an opportunity to build real careers in the art market.

However, what this event did is far more powerful. Thanks to the art spreading in the neighbourhood, new businesses and successful galleries decided to settle here, helping to transform it into a really popular place, that can’t be missed. It is now one of the top tourist attractions in the city.

I had an incredible experience staying in Miami for the past few days exploring Wynwood wonders myself. In order to see more pictures & stories from Wynwood Walls check our Instagram.

Here is a selection of some of my favourite artworks:

Seth
Seth
Futura 2000
Futura 2000
Continue Reading10th anniversary of Wynwood Walls!

Ardif: There, everything is order and beauty, gables, gears and toothed wheels.

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On the occasion of the Festiwall 2019, I had dedicated a post to the fresco of Ardif to say all the good I thought of this young artist. His fresco of the Oberkampf Wall arouses a great deal of interest and highlights Ardif’s singular talent.
It represents a dragon and occupies almost all the space of the billboard made available to the association the M.U.R. by the borough council (4x3m). The species of flying dragons is composed of many subspecies: the dragon painted by Ardif is, shall we say, Asian (it is not necessary to go into detail of the differences between Tibetan, Chinese and Japanese dragons). Let’s say that this dragon is Tibetan since the artist dedicates his work to Tibet (Art for Tibet). It deploys its long serpentiform body along the entire length of the wall. On the model of the mechanimals, appear as a skinned internal organ of the dragon made of mechanical parts and ancient architectures. The dragon is painted black and white except the iris of the eye painted blue.

Since the Man paints, he painted animals. It is therefore not their representation that distinguishes Ardif from other artists. Although the precision of the stroke and the quality of the execution is quite remarkable. The originality of Ardif’s artistic project, which he calls the mechanimals, an ardifian neologism formed by the contraction of mechanics and animals, is the combination of animal painting and “technical drawing”.
Not being able to say everything about Ardif’s art, I will focus on what I think is most innovative, the mixture of mechanics and architecture that is supposed to be the dragon’s bowels.
An Innovative artist, I use the word against the odds, because this curious mixture refers to an aesthetic from the second half of the 19th century. Let’s dwell for a moment on what I called “technical drawing.” Of course, it is an image because the work is completely painted. But the line by its precision evokes industrial design. In a recent interview, Ardif refers to it: “Learning to draw technically has influenced my way of doing, through the use of fine felt, Rotring. I often start with a pencil that is coarse enough for the composition, before drawing the animal. These tools allow working the textures, feathers, furs, or scales, which will then influence the work on the mechanical part and the objects that will compose it”. The artist is indeed the son of an architect and he studied architecture!

In his fresco of the Dragon, Ardif added only one touch of colour, the blue of the eye. If we look at the whole of his production, the collages and frescoes, the least we can say is that the painter uses colour with relative parsimony, at least for the mechanical part of the animals. This trait reinforces the kinship with the technical drawing. Besides, the use of greys, blacks of different densities and whites more or less pure reinforces the contrast with the “physical” part of the animal. Ardif rightly insists on this point: “Black and white is a base that I like very much, even if from time to time I enhance it with colours because there are animals whose hue directly evokes something, whether it is the pink of the flamingo or the colour fox redhead. This marks an even more marked contrast with the machine and brings a novelty. »

The mechanical elements evoke an ancient time, that of the Industrial Revolution, of the steam engine, to situate it approximately the second half of the nineteenth century, roughly the Second Empire. The mechanics are not only that of another time, but it is also aged in its appearance. Ardif could represent superb copper or brass gears, combined with steel gables, black with blue reflections. Others have done it before him. He gives his old mechanics the patina of the passing of time. It is not the brilliance of metals that interests him but much more the reference to aesthetic. The artist “quotes his sources” in an interview: “It’s a cultural influence that comes from the films I loved, like Star Wars, which represent an aged, dented and underground future. Art, like the city, must have a patina, strata. The technology I draw could not be Apple, it is an open-mechanism technology, which shows the circuit boards. Technology is first and foremost a mechanic, a production line. It’s the same in architecture: I prefer raw concrete to a matted concrete, raw wood to smooth and varnished wood, rusty metal to polished metal. Steampunk is the culture of Jules Verne and Hayao Miyazaki: flying machines are not a match! In this, “The travelling castle”, with its improbable but coherent architecture, is a fantasy. »

What about steampunk? A definition of this literary current is probably necessary: “This is a euchronia referring to the massive use of steam engines at the beginning of the industrial revolution and then in the Victorian era. The term “steampunk” is a term coined to describe a genre of literature born at the end of the 20th century. The term was coined in the late 1980s as a reference to cyberpunk (a term that appeared in 1984). The influence of steampunk literature was certainly decisive in the implementation of Ardif’s artistic project, but I have the weakness to think that the illustrations of Jules Verne’s novels and in particular those of the Herschel collection played a role essential in its representational choices (use of black and white, “futuristic” design of machines and vehicles, etc.).
I admit to being sensitive to this aesthetic and this for very personal reasons. I was fascinated by the 10 Baltard pavilions in the “Halles de Paris”, with the architecture of Eiffel Iron. The memory of my discovery of the Museum of Arts and Crafts, a little over a half-century ago, remains a very much tinged moment with joy and mystery.

Today, the museum’s metro station reflects this aesthetic; a red copper station transformed into Nautilus, with its windows and giant gears. When I was 10, I wanted to be a locomotive driver. They were monstrous, huge, stifling jets of steam and boiling water, their steel wheels squealing on the rails in a firework of sparks. I wish I’d driven them like Ben-Hur’s tank! They were “human beasts” as Ardif’s animals are “machine animals”.

Written by:

Richard Tassart in another life was a teacher. First, professor of letters and inspector of national education for almost 3 decades. It is in this context that he trained and advised the professors of the City of Paris in Fine Arts. In 2013, considering that street art had little attention in the media as contemporary painting, he created a blog in which he applied to urban art the analytical grids previously used by scholarly critics. This first blog, “Between Lines, Between Words,” gave birth to two blogs entirely dedicated to street art: Street-arts.blog and Entre les Lignes. Richard Tassart is also the author of exhibition catalogues, biographies of painters and web designer for street artists. Co-founder with Itvan Kébadian of the association Nxptune, an association that promotes urban arts, he gives lectures in colleges and high schools. He is currently considered an expert in graffiti and street art.

Continue ReadingArdif: There, everything is order and beauty, gables, gears and toothed wheels.

Where to find street art in Paris?

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Part 1: Belleville

The most known street art destination in Paris is undeniably Belleville.

Demography of the neighbourhood

Once an independent commune was later absorbed by the city of Paris in 1860. This working-class neighbourhood played a large part in the establishment of the Second French Republic. They were also the strongest supporters of the Paris Commune in 1871 (together with Menilmontant) with the toughest resistance against the Versailles Army.

@datenbank/dhm.php

In the 20th century, Belleville became a home to many immigrants and refugees and in the 1980s a Chinatown was established here. It is about the same time when artists and musicians started moving in. Cheap rents and the numerous vacant spaces that they could easily turn into squats and workshops, as well as the charming little streets, attracted them. When graffiti movement arrived in Paris it was practised in Belleville, mainly at Rue Dénoyez.

Artists of Belleville

Many famous artists come from this neighbourhood including can-can dancer Jane Avril, film director Maurice Tourneur, singer Eddy Mitchell and of course Edith Piaf. According to the legend, Edith Piaf was born under a lamppost at the stairs of Rue de Belleville. The biographical movie La Vie En Rose was shot partially in here. Another famous film realised in Belleville is Red Balloon by Albert Lamorisse.

Today, thanks to its popularity and street art scene, some compare Belleville to Shoreditch, however, it hasn’t been as gentrified as London’s art district. Numerous spaces are still occupied by social housing.

Among various highlights of the area are its beautiful parks: Parc de Belleville and Parc des Buttes Chaumont where locals love to picnic. You can also find a large number of cool bars and music venues in the evening. Thanks to its location on the second tallest hill in Paris, the views from up here are amazing.

Belleville is still very popular among artists, including sculptures, filmmakers, musicians and writers, many of who have their art studios, galleries, workshops or apartments here. They are undeniably the heart of the local community engaging cultural projects and activities.

One of the most popular cultural centres in the area is named “la Bellevilloise”, after a form of local dialect that people used to speak here.

In 2016 Belleville was named one of the most unique neighbourhoods in the world (by https://www.howitravel.co/).

If you would like to explore this area and find out more about its street art scene, you can book a tour with us: https://www.streetarttourparis.com/belleville/

We would love to show you around! 

Written by:

Kasia Klon foundress of Street Art Tour Paris; artist (MFA in painting and printmaking) and a licensed tour guide.

Continue ReadingWhere to find street art in Paris?
Treize bis!
@Streetarttourparis

Treize bis!

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On the sky, in the tail and the very last brilliance of the Situationists comet of the creation of the late seventies, appears the Copy Art.  The pictures are reproduced with discolouration, reshaped and recomposed. Some artistic groups such as Support/Surface have already broken the neck of what was the traditional painting; the beauty is conceived, after Guy Debord’ words as “temporary and experienced”. Even on the streets where it has taken place from the favour of 1968 May’s protesting movement. Excitement for creation in the Beaus Arts’s studio and the posters the students produced are still famous nowadays. Drawing is anonymous and inspired more by the masses than the individuals, becomes collective, like a single number lost among the others.


@Véronique Mâle

It’s Treize bis’ idea, to get lost among the crowd, being only a number, but such a one! A magical one who sounds like an enigma. It unifies the bad luck number since the knights of the Temple were arrested this very Friday of October the 13rd of 1307, with the Latin locution that invites to do it again. It is the reflection of the ambiguity of the artist, talking to us in a mysterious two different ton voices. Is it a code, a souvenir of a former address?


@Treize Bis

Treize bis uses inks just like a poet, making collages of different images, keeping all the rebellious flavour and self technique of Copy Art. Not only ambiguous in the style, but also in the discourse. What is shown is talking to us. “What we see is watching us” after Merleau-Ponty and that’s the theme the artist has developed since a couple of years, through the “I see you” project by pasting singular eyes, sometimes like a garland and complementing a piece of art and sometimes alone like a signature. 

From the Tuileries gardens to every urban landscape like an old fishmonger or a simple wall that would have been one-eyed without the artist’s intervention. It turns it out in cyclopean apparel. One has to admit that the task is ambitious; to change our contemporary way of looking, to give them a giant’s eye so that they will be able to get a new blink upon the city. They prevent us to have an unofficial look on our everyday life, to miss the sleeping beauty that can emerge out of our circuits, just a matter of paying attention. The visual bombs the artist sticks on the walls are sometimes disturbing. Because they never get tired of questioning our social, selfish and sexual habits. Like a Socratic maïeutics, the questions are done on purpose to give visibility on our answers, reflect on our close nature, to make them appear huge on the wall, in black and white.

@Gabrielle Colibri

@Treize Bis

Article written by:

Sigismond Cassidanius, polymorphic artist. He makes stencils and belongs to a group of collagists. He also writes press releases about other street-artists for their exhibitions and he animates a group on Facebook.His passion for street-art movement grew since the 90’s when, together with his friends, he created the association JONAS. They have been involved in squatting the former Lycée Diderot (Pole-Pi) in 1995 until 1999 and organized festivals of urban arts in Montmartre. After his bachelor in history of Paris he oriented himself to the working class anthropology and the urban economy. He has been working for 20 years for the city of Paris as a pedagogical responsible. Today he shares his passion for urban artistry through guiding and his support of the Collective 3 Couronnes in Belleville.


Continue ReadingTreize bis!
Frères d’Art – exhibition without title
@Isabelle Virot

Frères d’Art – exhibition without title

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In the forest in Brittany is a clearing where the Leprechauns like to gather to play a game called Brothers of Art. They may be as many assistants as the two brothers need. The Leprechauns dance and sing along in a lovely merry-go-round. Everybody’s invited in the middle is supposed to name a new material that can be used for a canvas, until their ideas come to an end. When a foreigner lost in the moor can name a new material, they cover him with gold!

The two painters are brothers but mainly artists. They have been inherited of the art taught by the dwarfs, the blacksmiths of the ancient mine, masters in the assembly of metals. They know how to mound the amber with iron.

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@Isabelle Virot

Freebooters of rust and master mariners of driftwoods, they operate and no one is better commanding at our emotions. The corrosion of the metal and the work the sea has done upon the wood, form the background of the canvas and the layers of their stencils appear coordinated. I am thinking of the portrait of this woman who reminds me of Bouche-Dorée, one of  Corto Maltese’s ghosts…

But here no cross, Monk, nor Calvary in the very universe of the brothers. Their cosmogony is telluric, maybe after the Norwegian tale of the struggle between mighty giants who spread their bodies across the earth. It’s a pagan universe, but not godless.

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@Isabelle Virot
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@Isabelle Virot

In the little music they orchestrate lies the smart deconstruction of the clichés, all these pictures we know by heart, in their assemblage of each detail to make it sound. They reach the coda when a spectator recognizes the original tune when he makes up his mind about the first history of a second-hand part. It’s like a revelation that leads him along the shore until the forest of signs, which the two brothers in art like to install deep in their canvas. Like a treasure.

The quantity of portraits tells a lot about how much they consider meeting people is important in their work. They are so many different that sometimes when I am on the ground, I feel like if I had been invited by the Leprechauns in the ronde…

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@Isabelle Virot

VERNISSAGE ON FRIDAY 13/09/2019 ! at LAVO//MATIK
Exhibition from 13th to 28th September
20 Bvld du General Jean Simon, Paris 13eme

Post written by:

Sigismond Cassidanius, polymorphic artist. He makes stencils and belongs to a group of collagists. He also writes press releases about other street-artists for their exhibitions and he animates a group on Facebook.His passion for street-art movement grew since the 90’s when, together with his friends, he created the association JONAS. They have been involved in squatting the former Lycée Diderot (Pole-Pi) in 1995 until 1999 and organized festivals of urban arts in Montmartre.
After his bachelor in history of Paris he oriented himself to the working class anthropology and the urban economy. He has been working for 20 years for the city of Paris as a pedagogical responsible. Today he shares his passion for urban artistry through guiding and his support of the Collective 3 Couronnes in Belleville.

Continue ReadingFrères d’Art – exhibition without title

Top 10 best street art themed bars in Paris

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1.La Felicità

Address: 5 Parvis Alan Turing, 75013 Paris

Former rail freight depot is now a home for Station F (a business incubator for startups), and La Felicità – currently the biggest of Big Mamma Group restaurants in Paris. Place includes a 1000m2 sunny terrace, 3 bars, several different Italian cuisines, and a cafeteria. Trains are great canvases for graffiti writers and street artists. Big Mamma decided to keep that artistic vibe by inviting them to decorate the space; The impressive spay paintings on train wagons and big lanterns were done by many popular local street artists including Jerome Mesnager, Oji, Tetar, Mr Pee, ChaNoir, Bault, and many others. La Felicita hosts special events, exhibitions and concerts. Great place to visit after our Murals XXL Tour (click here to book it).

2.Fluctuart

Address: 2 port du Gros Caillou, 75007 Paris

Just recently opened – first Street Art Museum on water! The boat has three levels: Bottom is reserved for temporary exhibitions (currently presenting works from Brooklyn based artist Swoon), middle level has a permanent collection of some of the most representative artists from around the world including Futura 2000 or Vhils, and the upper level is reserved for a bar where the menu is printed on old spray cans. Fluctuart organizes great events and concerts in the evenings, and during the day, workshops in collaboration with Le Musée en Herbe. You can also find a bookstore here – All dedicated to Street Art!

Photo credit:
https://cestunjourpour.com

3.Barbouquin

Address: 1 rue Dénoyez, 75020 Paris

If you want to feel the real spirit of Belleville (the most artistic neighbourhood in Paris) you ve got to visit Barbouquin. The name is a mix between the words “bar” and “book”. The place is based on the everchanging Graffiti Street, where every day a new piece pops up. The owner of Barbouquin – Yohanna Uzan – has a great deal with local artists, allowing them to enter the walls outside as well as inside. Check out some great artworks by Stew, Prwnd, Shiry, Suriani and many, many more! And during the weekend come to listen to some original live music performed by talented young artists like Theko, Gatica or Fuensanta Mendes.

4.Culture Rapide

Address: 103 Rue Julien Lacroix, 75020 Paris

Best is to visit Culture Rapide during the summer when all the tables are moved to the terrace next to the community garden and many colourful spray paintings. Two biggest walls are taken by Ben 93 and Jean Le Gac. Originally there was a building connecting those two walls, but the city decided to demolish it while building the new metro line that goes just bellow Rue Belleville (line 11). Culture Rapide is, in fact, more than a bar, it has a vibe of a small cabaret in Montmartre in the late 1890s. Local artists meet up here to play music, participate in the open mic or to take part in Poetry Slams.

5.La Place Verte

Address: 105 Rue Oberkampf, 75011 Paris

Named after the former green wall (that you can still see in the video clip by the band Beirut, for their “Nantes” hit from 2007) this is a spot to visit while in Paris. Twice a month Association Le Mur is inviting an artist to paint the former billboard located just in front of their terrace. If you come at the right time (join one of our Belleville tours on Saturdays!) you would be a witness to a live performance. The place allows the association to keep some of the materials inside, and they offer free drinks to celebrate the inauguration of every new wall. If you stay there, you have many possibilities to meet the artists and event organizers. So far La Place Verte hosted more than 280 artists from all over the world including stars like: Logan Hicks (USA), Mist (France), Stinkfish (Mexico/Colombia), Bordalo II (Portugal), Reka (Australia), Herakut (Germany), Roa (Belgium) and Pener (Poland) to name a few.

6.L’Age d’Or

Address: 26 Rue du Dr Magnan, 75013 Paris

Similar to Le Mur, this place has its wall reserved for live performances. They change their facade every two months. Other than that you can find here some interesting exhibitions, ateliers and lots of interesting concerts.

Photo credit: @zig_sriracha

7.La Comedia

Address: 88 Rue Edouard Vaillant, 93100 Montreuil

Some people are calling Montreuil a Brooklyn of Paris… and there are some reasons for it. Many artists can’t afford to live in Paris, therefor majority of them are living in close suburbs, like Vitry, Ivry, Saint Denis, Pantin or MONTREUIL. Montreuil is full of artists ateliers and great places to hang out. La Comedia stands out among others with its awesome alternative vibe. Come especially if you are interested in discovering new talents during the jam sessions.

Photo credit:
https://www.facebook.com/pg/PointEphemere/

8.Point Éphémère

Address: 200 Quai de Valmy, 75010 Paris

Everybody who lives in Paris knows Point Ephemere. Its great exhibition and concert space. Outside there are some walls reserved for their invited artists (currently YZ and YAKES), but most are open for anyone who can express themselves. Among others, you can find works by artists like Invader, Mr Bmx, or our friend Vic Oh. The place is just next to the water, was formerly used as a fire station. Group of
people have turned it from the abounded squat into an artists residence spaces (4 artists’ studios, a dance studio, 5 music rehearsal studios). Today is probably one of the city’s most popular places.

Photo credit:
baladesniko.blogspot.com 

9.Le Hasard Ludique

Address: 128, avenue de Saint-Ouen, 75018 Paris

Based on the old train station this place is a mix between a club, a restaurant and a bar. The terrace is based just next to the old train tracks where you can see some of the city’s oldest graffiti as well as the brand new ones – some in the making in front of your own eyes. The place is constantly evolving and it is a pleasure to watch.

Photo credit: @MamZelle-Bulle/ https://www.anousparis.fr/a-suivre/les-grands-voisins-cest-vraiment-la-fin/

10.Grand Voisins

Address: 74 Avenue Denfert-Rochereau, 75014 Paris

Not far from the official Catacombs, here s another gem worth your attention. Grand Voisins is a community of asylum seekers recently arrived in Paris, hundreds of associations, artists, craftsmen, and
young companies developing their activities. The place has great home-cooked food at a good price and they make their lemonade. Originally a hospital, Grand Voisins It is a temporary project that would likely close down in 2020. Walking around notice great murals painted by Jace (la Reunion), Alexone (France), Jean-Baptiste Di Marco & Romain Render (France), Kouka (France/Congo) and all the rest wonderful street art there.

Some other great places that did not make the list, but are also worthy of recommendation: la péniche Grande Fantaisie, 104, La Maison des Frigos, Le Jardin d’Alice, Café Mama Kin, La Mutinerie, Les écuries. What do you think about our choices? Do you agree or disagree? Would you recommend some other places? Let us know in the comments!

Article written by:

Kasia Klon, foundress of Street Art Tour Paris; artist (MFA in painting and printmaking) and a licensed tour guide. 

Continue ReadingTop 10 best street art themed bars in Paris
Rainbow Village
Photo Credit: Eva Bouvard

Rainbow Village

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Our friend Eva writes about her experience in Taiwanese village in Nantun District know for its incredible street art. All streets are painted by 96-year-old Huang Yung-Fu, former soldier, that saves his village from demolition by turning it into a “Rainbow Village”.


Photo Credit: Eva Bouvard

My experience at the rainbow village was amazing. A few months back, while scrolling on Facebook, I found a short documentary from the BBC talking about the place and giving a bit of info about the back story. This incredibly cute grandad called Mr Huang Yong-Fu didn’t want his village to be destroyed by real estate developer, so he decided to start painting his house, then his street, then his neighbours’ houses. The students from the University nearby started noticing, taking pictures and helping him to campaign against the demolition. The local government mailbox flooded with complaints and the tourist started to visit in larger number, so that is how he managed to save the village. Mr Huang Yong-Fu was a former soldier and had no background or education in art whatsoever which for me, made it even more fascinating. The documentary didn’t say exactly where the place was, it was quite vague, just mentioning China.


Photo Credit: Eva Bouvard

So I was more than surprised when I decided to take a short trip to Taiwan and discovered that it was actually located there. After a few days in Taipei with is a very interesting city, especially culturally (the fine art museum is TO DIE FOR), I hopped on a train to Taichung.
Taichung itself isn’t that amazing but it has its charms. Large Town, with great food and close to some unbelievable nature.
On my second day there, I took a local bus (thanks to google map since all indication where in Chinese) and after a 45 minutes ride I reached the Nantun District, considered a suburb of Taichung.


Photo Credit: Eva Bouvard

The actual Rainbow village is quite small, only 11 houses are left. If you rush through it you will be done in 10 minutes but if you enjoy it, you can easily spend a few hours observing every detail from the floor to the ceiling, grabbing a rainbow ice cream or a cup of bubble tea (one on Taiwan many specialities) and taking a million photos of what Rainbow grandpa has painted.


Photo Credit: Eva Bouvard

Photo Credit: Eva Bouvard

His style is very bright, colourful and kiddish. He painted many faces, characters, animals or monsters, sometimes in quite funny situations, as well as some patterns and Chinese characters that sadly, I couldn’t understand.
If you are lucky, you might spot him wandering around, sitting in a corner or even painting. Just approach him with a smile and you might shake his hand and take a photo with him.


Photo Credit: Eva Bouvard

You may wonder what I was doing in China? Just travelling. I needed to clear my head since I had a pretty rough end of the year so I thought it would be a great idea to change my surroundings for a little bit. Since I live in Thailand and love Asian culture in general, I wanted to take the opportunity to visit different countries that are just close by.

Written by:

Eva Bouvard, I’m a 31-year-old French designer. I like to call myself an image maker because I just like to create things. I have a background in Graphic design and I also do photography and fashion design. I’m passionate about travels, architecture and different cultures.
I have travelled, worked and lived a few different countries from China to Australia and New Zealand to the Uk. My portfolio: https://www.atelisma.com/

Continue ReadingRainbow Village
Beyond Walls
Photo credits: https://france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr

Beyond Walls

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Under the Eiffel Tower, a huge but mysterious picture of hands connected with each other forming a chain has recently appeared on Champs de Mars.

The author of this touching gesture is the French artist known as SAYPE.
With this action, he wanted to support the SOS Méditerranée organization,
which since 2015 has been saving the lives of people crossing the sea at the world’s deadly migration route.

The Eiffel Tower accepted this project to celebrate humanity and mutual aid as priceless values. Other than SETE (Société d’Exploitation de la Tour Eiffel) art-project had support from la Ville de Paris, MTArt Agency, and B Corp.

The name of SAYPE’s oeuvre is ‘Beyond Walls’, it measures approximately 15,000 m2 and is made of 100% biodegradable paint based on natural pigments (chalk and charcoal).

The spectacle is (as in the case of most street art) only temporary. With the regrowth of the grass and weather conditions, it will disappear over time. Hurry up if you do not want to miss it! The best view of this chain of human hands is of course from the top of the Eiffel Tower.

‘Beyond Walls’ starts in Paris but it will not end here. SAYPE plans to travel around the world for the next 3 years to continue this message.

This is not the first time, however, when the Eiffel Tower allows artists to intervene on the larger scale. In 2015, during the COP 21 with the support of la Mairie de Paris, the world-famous artist Shepard Fairey (better known as Obey) attached a huge sphere between first and second floors of the tower. It was supposed to reflect ‘Earth Crisis’ and it was named after that. Between decorative flowers of this 8-meter “ornament” hanging from the tower like a Christmas ball (it was December 11th), it unveiled the scenes symbolizing the dangers of, among others, global warming and increase of air pollution.

The project was carried out with the initiative of Gallery Itinerrace – one of the most influential galleries promoting urban art.

And just a year later, during Nuit Blanche, another American artist – Cleon Peterson – was allowed a giant playfield under the Eiffel Tower, decorating it with huge 500m2 mural: ‘Endless Sleep’.
The white and black dancing figures represented the scene taken from the Italian novel Hypnerotomachia Poliphili – the leading subject for Nuit Blanche 2016. Cleon Peterson used it as a pretext to raise the subject of our modern dilemma of division and the search for social and political union. In the modern, global society, the differences are either bringing us together or forcing us further apart.

Have a look below at the pictures of each of these massive projects and let us know in the comments which had the biggest impact on you. Which one did you enjoy most?

Photo credits:
www.toureiffel.paris

Photo credits: https://www.unoeilquitraine.fr

Article written by:

Kasia Klon, foundress of Street Art Tour Paris; artist (MFA in painting and printmaking) and a licensed tour guide. 

Continue ReadingBeyond Walls
RNST – ‘HAPPY DAY’ – 22/06-08/07
Photo credits: @instahub

RNST – ‘HAPPY DAY’ – 22/06-08/07

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The wind of revolt blows on the walls…so strongly that they are wearing a red scarf.
RNST
is the contrary of being an isolated painter rally all the votes in France, the French being naturally revolted.

After all it is the country that has invented  the communism, at Tours in 1920 as everybody knows. The famous “L’Internationale”song had his lyrics written by a Frenchman…

The wind of revolt blows on the walls…so strongly that they are wearing a red scarf.
RNST is the contrary of being an isolated painter rally all the votes in France, the French being naturally revolted.

After all, it is the country that has invented the communism, in Tours in 1920 as everybody knows. The famous “L’Internationale” song had his lyrics written by a Frenchman…

The colour he shows is one of the rivers of blood that has spread down the hills of Belleville in May 1871 during the “bloody week”, of the Spree river carrying Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg’s corpses, of the eponymous army of Leon Trotsky.

The red: half of the colours of the city of Paris with the blue, that has encircled the white of the royalty to make the French flag. It paradoxically reminds us of the “Oriflamme” that the kings hold at Saint-Denis when he raised troops for war.

This enlightens suburban guerilla, this sun daze that slides to the east is the distinctive signature of RNST.
Tenderness of the embrace. Embrace of the tenderness between favour and fear, curled up in the arms of a grizzly, in the space between the mouth and the scarf, exactly like the place reserved to the freedom of expression.

The RNST‘s revolted soul is strong in heart. He is showing his colours with proudness. He cautiously asserts his heritage. Humble, he only displays his opinions but shows only one colour.

Photo credits: jlsouc & Le mur
Photo credits: jlsouc & Le mur
Photo credits:
http://www.jestemwpodrozy.com
Photo credits:
http://www.jestemwpodrozy.com

RNST – ‘HAPPY DAY’ Vernissage 21st JUNE at Le Lavo//matik

Article written by:

Sigismond Cassidanius, polymorphic artist. He makes stencils and belongs to a group of collagists. He also writes press releases about other street-artists for their exhibitions and he animates a group on Facebook.His passion for street-art movement grew since the 90’s when, together with his friends, he created the association JONAS. They have been involved in squatting the former Lycée Diderot (Pole-Pi) in 1995 until 1999 and organized festivals of urban arts in Montmartre.
After his bachelor in history of Paris he oriented himself to the working class anthropology and the urban economy. He has been working for 20 years for the city of Paris as a pedagogical responsible. Today he shares his passion for urban artistry through guiding and his support of the Collective 3 Couronnes in Belleville.

Continue ReadingRNST – ‘HAPPY DAY’ – 22/06-08/07